Quantum Coins and Nano Sensors

We aim at fabrication and testing of devices from polycrystalline diamond targeting two main applications: The development of dedicated quantum memory for quantum coins implementation and quantum sensing of magnetic fields. With the deterministic nano-implantation system we will integrate nuclear spins next to color centers such that long lived quantum states can be stored. Low-cost polycrystalline diamond fabrication expertise and nano-structuring facilities allow us to tackle the full production chain of the final device. The theory partners in Kassel will enhance the protection of the quantum coin by identifying decoherence-free subspaces (DFS). This improves the quality of the quantum coin but also allows for the realization of sensors that are protected against environmental noise with increased sensitivity to signals outside of the DFS, providing the design principle for sensitive and selective nano-gradient sensors. The theory partner in Erlangen will focus on quantum and classical protocols to implement a robust quantum device. They will develop protocols based on redundancy and error correction specifically optimized for this application.

Pro­ject Part­ners

  • Prof. Kilian Singer, Institute of Physics, Light-Matter Interactions, University of Kassel
  • Prof. Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler, Institute of Physics, University of Mainz
  • Prof. Christiane Koch, Institute of Physics, Theoretical Physics, University of Kassel
  • Prof. Eric Lutz, Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg

Pic­ture gal­lery

Fig. 1: Diamond AFM with NV color center at tip apex: quantum coin consisting of NV centers (red) with neighboring nuclear spin (black) for long-term qubit storage; Tailored microwave fields for entanglement generation between the spins at.
Fig. 1: Diamond AFM with NV color center at tip apex: quantum coin consisting of NV centers (red) with neighboring nuclear spin (black) for long-term qubit storage; Tailored microwave fields for entanglement generation between the spins at.
Fig. 2: Silicon-vacancy color center in a waveguide for efficient fiber coupling.
Fig. 2: Silicon-vacancy color center in a waveguide for efficient fiber coupling.
Fig. 3: SiV center used for entanglement generation, the state subsequently written into the nuclear spin, readout performed at RT by virtue of the coupled NV center.
Fig. 3: SiV center used for entanglement generation, the state subsequently written into the nuclear spin, readout performed at RT by virtue of the coupled NV center.