Lehr­ver­an­stal­tun­gen

From Colonialism to Globalization

Anil Shah

MA GPED

Do 10:00-14:00 Uhr, Moritzstr. 25-31 Systembau 3 - Raum 0305

This seminar will trace the history of the modern political and economic world order from colonialism to globalization. Students will engage with twelve landmark events between the seventeenth and twenty-first century to make sense of the emergence, consequences, and contemporary forms of global inequalities. The course introduces key concepts like capitalism, imperialism, decolonization, and neoliberalism and uses them to show continuities and ruptures in the making of the contemporary world. At the end of the class students can identify and analyze key mechanisms that shape the global political economy. The seminar will be complemented by a tutorial which provides space for personal and peer-reflection on the topics, texts, and personal experiences. Moreover, the tutorial will introduce some basic academic skills.

 

Introduction to GPED Tutorial

Anil Shah

MA GPED

Mo 10:00-12:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023

This tutorial introduces students to the fundamentals of Global Political Economy and Development. It is designed as a supplement to the other core courses ‘From Colonialism to Globalisation’ and ‘Governance of the World Markets’. Students will learn about the origins, goals, and perspectives of the following three transdisciplinary research areas: Development Studies, International Political Economy (IPE), and Postcolonial Studies. The course is structured into three major parts. The first will engage with what GPE is and how it evolved as an academic approach since the 1970s. Emphasis will be laid on the history of political and economic thought, and how political science became separated from economics. The second part covers the history and state of development studies as well as critiques and alternative approaches to studying global inequalities from the perspective of postcolonial studies. The final part of the course draws on current debates and selected issues concerning poverty, inequality, and sustainable development to show how different approaches may be applied to contemporary phenomena.

 

Governance of the World Market: Institutions and actors in trade, finance and development

Aram Ziai

MA GPED

Di 16:00-18:30 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023

The course will provide an introduction to the most important institutions of the global political economy, the World Trade Organisation, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. It will discuss the international division of labour and global value chains, the Bretton Woods system and its failure, the attempts to establish a New International Economic Order and the debt crisis and the subsequent Structural Adjustment Programs and their effects. The gender dimension of the global political economy and the role of multinational companies will also be discussed.

 

Post-Development - Introduction and current debates

Aram Ziai

MA GPED, MA Politikwissenschaft

Blockseminar vom 16.-18.12.1022, Domäne Frankenhausen

Post-Development approaches can be conceived of as theories of imperialism focusing on the discourse and practice of ‘development’. They challenge the very foundations of development theory and policy as being Eurocentric and constituting relations of power between those defined as ‘developed’ and as ‘underdeveloped’. They propose ‘alternatives to development’ to be found in grassroots movements and indigenous communities which go beyond the Western models of the economy, politics and knowledge.

The seminar will deal with some of the main texts of Post-Development, current contributions to or critiques of PD, and presentations by the students of empirical examples.

 

Climate and Development Finance

Frauke Banse

MA GPED

Mi 10:00-12:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3024

In recent years, we have often heard of an end to development aid, of a new partnership at eye level, for example, between Africa and Europe.

Among other things, the idea is to give less public money from Western countries to so called development projects in the Global South. Instead, more private money should flow to financing roads, schools, health care or ports. The financing of climate protection is also closely related to this. Thus, also for projects of renewable energies less public, but rather private funds are to be activated.

But what is behind the postulate of "beyond aid"? What are the social consequences of this paradigm shift in development aid and climate protection? How are these new financing practices to be classified in the global dynamics of a financialization, i.e., a growing political and economic influence of financial markets actors?

After clarifying what is meant by financialization, we will first address the question of the relationship between financialization, development aid and climate finance. Afterwards, we will deal more concretely with the social, economic, and political consequences of this connection.

For participating in the seminar, knowledge of international political economy or development/ climate policies is an advantage, but not a must. You will, however, need a general curiosity to get involved in economic issues.

 

Das Politische der Klima- und Entwicklungsfinanzierung, Teil II

Frauke Banse

MA Politikwissenschaft

Di 10:00-12:00 Uhr, Kurt-Schumacher 25 - Raum 2210/2212

Bei dem Seminar handelt es sich um den zweiten Teil des Projektseminars. Dieser wird inhaltlich sehr stark von den studentischen Projektgruppen geprägt werden, genaue inhaltliche Schwerpunkte sind entlang der jeweiligen Projektinhalte in Planung. Studierende, die ihre Abschlussarbeit zu dem Thema Entwicklungs- und Klimafinanzierung planen, können nach Rücksprache gern zusätzlich an dem Seminar teilnehmen.

 

Einführung in das politikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten

Frauke Banse

BA Politikwissenschaft

Di 14:00-16:00 Uhr, Nora-Platiel 6 - Raum 0211

In diesem Seminar und im dazu zugehörigen Tutorium (von Sophia Schönig) geht es darum, die grundlegenden Fertigkeiten für ein erfolgreiches Studium der Politikwissenschaft zu erlernen. Wie lese und schreibe ich wissenschaftliche Texte? Wie zitiere ich korrekt? Wie entwickle ich eine Fragestellung und eine Gliederung? Wie erkenne ich verschiedene Thesen von Autor*innen? Weshalb ist eine gute Begriffsarbeit bedeutend für die politikwissenschaftliche Analyse? Diese und andere Fragen behandeln wir anhand des Themenfeldes Globalisierung.

 

Einführung in die Nord-Süd Beziehungen

Nina Baghery

BA Politikwissenschaft

Do 16:00-18:00 Uhr, Nora-Platiel 5 - Raum 0107

Das Seminar befasst sich mit der Geschichte und Struktur der Nord-Süd-Beziehungen. Zentral besprochen wird der Zusammenhang zwischen der kolonialen Expansion des Kapitalismus zu aktuellen globalen Ungleichheitsverhältnissen. Nach einer kurzen Einführung in Ansätze und Grundbegriffe der Postkolonialen Studien sowie der Internationalen Politischen Ökonomie, wird die Geschichte des europäischen Kolonialismus im Zusammenhang mit der internationalen Reproduktion von sozialen und ökonomischen Ungleichheiten analysiert. Anschließend wird die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit (EZ) als Instrument der politischen und ökonomischen Behandlung von globalen Ungleichheiten in den Blick genommen. Unter Betrachtung der Agenda der deutschen EZ wird untersucht, inwiefern ihre Ausrichtung koloniale Herrschafts- und Ausbeutungsverhältnisse fortführt. Abschließend werden Möglichkeiten und Grenzen von Post-Development und Degrowth Ansätze als Alternativen zum kapitalistischen Entwicklungsmodell diskutiert.

 

Climate Change: Foundations & Governance

Svenja Quitsch

MA GPED

Di 12:00-14:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3024

This course covers the main topics of global climate change and sustainable development. The aim is to equip students with the necessary knowledge to understand climatic and environmental change, interpret the models developed by the IPCC and evaluate political implications and policy responses within the context of sustainable development. More specifically, this course discusses concepts such as the earth’s climate system, planetary boundaries, various IPCC scenarios, mitigation and adaptation efforts, climate justice, the Paris Agreement, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and socio-ecological transformation.

N.B. This course follows the principles of problem-based learning (PBL), a co-creative and collaborative approach to learning that relies heavily on group discussions and independent self-study rather than lecture-style presentations.

 

Systems Thinking for Sustainability Transformations

Svenja Quitsch

MA GPED

Mo 16:00-18:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023

Achieving sustainability requires system change. But what even is a system? And how does a system change? Answering these two seemingly simple questions is at the core of this seminar. In the first part of this course, students learn basic concepts and tools of systems thinking and develop an in-depth understanding of system dynamics and transformations. In the second part, this new-found knowledge is applied to the governance of sustainability transformations.

N.B. This course follows the principles of problem-based learning (PBL), a co-creative and collaborative approach to learning that relies heavily on group discussions and independent self-study rather than lecture-style presentations.

 

International Organisations in World Politics

Matthias Kranke

MA GPED

Do 10:00-12:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3024

International organisations (IOs, understood here as intergovernmental organisations) are highly influential actors in world politics. Although only few contemporary IOs possess considerable material power, many contribute substantially to the setting of global political agendas and rules for international cooperation. Yet while we tend to read and learn only about a fairly small number of fairly large IOs that are often in the public spotlight, a fairly large number of fairly small IOs remains out of sight. The seminar wants to make such IOs more visible. After a brief introduction to some of the best-known IOs, students undertake (group) projects to conduct empirical research on less-well-known IOs. The overarching objective is to gain a better understanding of smaller IOs by developing a general profile of their activities and analysing key operations through case studies in greater depth. Because many IOs engage in routines of cooperation, the seminar also encourages students to pay attention to these widely neglected inter-organisational dynamics.

 

More or Less? Post-Growth in Global Politics

Matthias Kranke

MA GPED

Mi 16:00-18:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023

Global politics has been marked by the pursuit of economic growth for decades. The widely accepted approach has been to tout growth as a solution to various socioeconomic problems. However, this logic has overlooked the prevalence of socioecological problems, which arise from the constraints imposed on human affairs by ‘planetary boundaries’. This increasingly palpable trade-off between growth and sustainability raises nagging questions about how to do global politics in the first place. How to generate and secure prosperity? How to reduce poverty? How to generate energy? How to build physical and other infrastructures? How, in short, to organise contemporary societies and their economies? The seminar addresses these and related questions, introducing students to the concepts of ‘economic growth’ and ‘post-growth’ (and, relatedly, ‘degrowth’ and ‘sufficiency’). Within self-designed case study projects, students can deepen their grasp of the emerging debate on growth vs. post-growth in global politics.

 

Capitalism, Development & Underdevelopment

Tolga Tören

MA GPED

Mo 18:00-20:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023

Since the end of World War II, there has been an interest in the ‘development’ or ‘industrialization’ problems of the ”underdeveloped countries” by scholars from the US or from European countries. In addition to the studies carried out at universities, many studies on development issues were supported or financed by some institutions including the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation etc. In other words, during the period, the development issue became one of the most prevalent topics at the academy and studies carried out by development economists, development sociologists or development anthropologists were gathered under the same headline: Modernization Theory.

Since the late 1950s, in parallel with the conditions of the world economy and debates on the relationship between ”developed” and ”underdeveloped” countries, different ”development” / ”underdevelopment” approaches, including the Latin American Structuralism, Dependency Theory, World-System Theory, the Theory of Articulation of Modes of Production, Basic Needs Approach, Washington Consensus, Institutionalist Economics and Post Development Approach, emerged.

From this, the aim of this course is critically to deal with the concepts of ”development” and ”underdevelopment” in parallel with the periodization of capitalist production relations on a world scale. In this context, during the course, the arguments of the approaches mentioned above will critically be discussed.

 

Labour, Capital, Welfare & Development in the Age of Globalization

Tolga Tören

MA GPED

Mi 8:00-10:00 Uhr, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3029

 

Ivan Illich – Selbstbegrenzung. Eine politische Kritik der Technik

Jacqueline Krause

BA Politikwissenschaft

Blockseminar, Vorbesprechung am 09.11.2022 von 12:00-14:00 Uhr

Das Seminar bietet die Möglichkeit einer intensiven Auseinandersetzung mit Ivan Illichs Kritik der Industriegesellschaft und seiner Werkzeuge. Es bietet die Möglichkeit des tieferen Verständnisses seiner Analysen und der daraus resultierenden möglichen Alternativen für postindustrielle, konviviale Gesellschaften. Was bedeutet Konvivilalität? Was umfasst seine Gesellschaftskritik? Was beinhaltet sein Modell multidimensionaler Ausgewogenheit? Welche Ansatzpunkte für sozial-ökologische Veränderungen sieht Illich? Dies und mehr wird im Seminar besprochen und diskutiert.

 

Decolonial Feminism

Hanna Al Taher

MA GPED, MA Politikwissenschaft

Blockseminar im Januar

Internationale Politik in einer postkolonialen Welt

Aram Ziai

BA Politikwissenschaft

Mi 08:00-10:00, Moritzstr. 18 Campus Center - Hörsaal 5 Raum 1101

Die Vorlesung befasst sich mit unterschiedlichen Bereichen internationaler Politik (Globalisierung, Krieg, Migration, Verschuldung, Klimawandel, Hunger, Terrorismus, Demokratisierung) aus der Perspektive unterschiedlicher Theorien (postkoloniale, feministische, marxistische, poststrukturalistische, neorealistische und institutionalistische Ansätze).

 

Theories of Development and GPE

Aram Ziai

MA GPED

Di 16:00-18:30, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023

After a general introduction on epistemology, the course will cover different paradigms concerning theories of global political economy, inequality and social change. It will engage with explanations from historical and contemporary perspectives (such as modernization, dependency, neo-gramscian and feminist approaches) and analyse their ontological and methodological assumptions – as well as their biases and blind spots. Each session usually consists of a 45 min lecture, 15 min break, and a 90 min seminar.

 

EU Investment and Development Policies in Africa

Frauke Banse

MA GPED/MA Nachhaltiges Wirtschaften/MA Politikwissenschaft

Mi 10:00-12:00, Moritzstr. 25-31 Systembau1 - Raum 0108

In this class, we will analyse the (contradictory) relationship between the investment and development policies of the European Union in Africa. Particular attention will be paid to the newly announced Global Gateway infrastructure initiative. Since this initiative is explicitly conceived as a geopolitical response to China's Belt and Road Initiative, this seminar will also address the geopolitical role of infrastructure and investment policies.

The course comprises of preparatory seminar sessions and online discussion with organisations based in Brussels and Accra. In the seminar sessions, we will discuss general questions concerning the EU trade, investment and development policies and ask which interest groups are dealing with these three interconnected policy fields. In the seminar sessions, student groups prepare the envisaged online meetings with representatives of these interest groups and decision-making bodies. The last session of the class will take place after the online meetings with the organisations. We will analyse the meetings conducted and discuss the conclusions.

As the preparation time is limited to only a few seminar sessions, dedicated readings and preparations are essential. Active participation in all seminar sessions is a precondition to taking part in the online discussions with the organisations. MA Students from ”Political Science” and ”Global Political Economy and Development” are invited to join the class.

 

Das Politische der Entwicklungs- und Klimafinanzierung

Frauke Banse

MA GPED/MA Nachhaltiges Wirtschaften/MA Politikwissenschaft

Di 10:00-12:00, Moritzstr. 18 Campus Center - Raum 1110, Seminarraum 1

In den letzten Jahren haben wir immer wieder von einem Ende der Entwicklungshilfe, von einer neuen Partnerschaft auf Augenhöhe z.B. zwischen Afrika und Europa gehört. Es gelte unter anderem, weniger Geld westlicher Staaten zu geben und stattdessen stärker private Gelder in die Finanzierung von Straßen, Schulen, Gesundheitsversorgung oder Häfen in so genannten Entwicklungsländern fließen zu lassen. Damit eng verwoben ist auch die Finanzierung des Klimaschutzes. So soll auch für Projekte erneuerbare Energien weniger öffentliche, sondern vielmehr private Gelder aktiviert werden. Doch was verbirgt sich hinter diesem Postulat? Welche gesellschaftlichen Folgen hat dieser Paradigmenwechsel in der Entwicklungshilfe und im Klimaschutz? Wie sind diese neuen Finanzierungspraktiken in die globalen Dynamiken einer Finanzialisierung, also eines wachsenden politischen und ökonomischen Einflusses von Finanzmarktakteuren, einzuordnen? In diesem ersten Teil des zweisemestrigen Projektseminars werden wir uns mit diesen Fragen intensiv beschäftigen. Nachdem wir geklärt haben, was unter Finanzialisierung zu verstehen ist, widmen wir uns zunächst der Frage nach dem Zusammenhang von Finanzialisierung, Entwicklungshilfe und Klimafinanzierung. Danach werden wir uns konkreter mit den gesellschaftlichen, ökonomischen und politischen Folgen dieses Zusammenhangs beschäftigen. Dieser erste Teil des Projektseminars im Sommersemester ist explizit auch für Studierende zugelassen, die lediglich eine einfache Studien- und oder Prüfungsleistung erwerben möchten. Im zweiten Teil des Projektseminars - also im Wintersemester - widmen wir uns dann ihren jeweiligen Projektarbeiten. In einer mehrtägigen Studienklausur auf der Domäne Frankenhausen werden wir uns intensiv mit ihren Studiendesigns beschäftigen, die sie dann im Laufe des WiSe in Gruppenarbeit erstellen werden. Für die Teilnahme am Seminar sind Kenntnisse der Internationalen Politischen Ökonomie oder der Entwicklungs- bzw. Klimapolitik von Vorteil, aber kein Muss. Sie brauchen jedoch eine generelle Neugier, sich in ökonomische Fragen einzuarbeiten. Zudem brauchen Sie für Ihre Projektarbeiten Kenntnisse der qualitativen Sozialforschung. Sollten Sie diese noch nicht haben, besuchen Sie bitte den parallel angebotenen Methodenkurs im Modul 5.

 

BA Kolloquium

Frauke Banse

BA Politikwissenschaft

Di 14:00-16:00, Moritzstr. 2 - Raum Incon

Das Kolloquium unterstützt BA Studierende in der Abschlussphase beim Anfertigen ihrer Abschlussarbeit. Wir werden einführend wichtige Anforderungen an eine BA Arbeit, Aufbau sowie Herausforderungen des theoretischen und empirischen Arbeitens besprechen. Je nach Anzahl der teilnehmenden Studierenden werden die Teilnehmenden in der zweiten Phase des Seminars ihr BA-Vorhaben einzeln präsentieren können oder sie fertigen in thematisch organisierten Arbeitsgruppen ein kurzes Forschungsexposé an. Auf Grundlage der Exposés werden wir dann die Herausforderungen gemeinsam diskutieren.

 

Postcolonial Political Economy

Caroline Cornier

MA GPED

Mo 12:00-14:00, Nora-Platiel 6 - Raum 0211

What stakes are at play within the current global political economy? Rising inequality, deepening social antagonisms, and market logic with impunity in the face of the climate emergency. International Political Economy has so far responded to these recurring concerns as representative of the long-standing relationship between power and wealth. Yet other relationships, namely those that involve imperialism, race and gender, and settler colonialism have been marginal to these debates. Following on recent calls for a more ‘global conversation’ within GPE that pays greater attention to spaces and communities beyond Europe and North America, this module seeks to confront the Eurocentric analysis of global political economy that might inform our understandings of contemporary issues of neoliberal conjuncture of global capitalism. This course offers an historically-informed reassessment of political economy that exposes its imperial foundations by drawing on the entangled histories between European industrialization, Atlantic slavery and its civilizing mission. The course broadly surveys the role of land and dispossession as both object and instrument of colonial power in the consolidation of the settler‐colonial state. The colonial origins of poverty within 18th century neoclassical tradition and the case of Haiti to explore ways debt was weaponized to compromise the nation-building processes of the world’s first black republic. This historical foregrounding situates contemporary challenges and political struggles as the colonial afterlives of contemporary global economic globalisation to explore issues of financialization and the “rise” of corporate power, global care work and social reproduction, extractive industries and the ecology as well as the return to alt-right populism and anti-imperial politics in the form of reparations. By confronting the colonial amnesia of the discipline, the module hopes to provide students with interdisciplinary analyses that renders visible global political economy to its embedded relationship with coloniality, racism, sexism or anthropocentrism and to invite new framings and questions to attend to the ongoing global crises.

 

Einführung in Postkoloniale Studien und Rassismus

Lucia Fuchs

BA Politikwissenschaft

Blockseminar: 18.07.2022 bis 22.07.2022 jeweils 08:00 bis 14:00, Arnold-Bode 10 - Raum 0104

Die postkolonialen Studien befassen sich mit den Nachwirkungen des Kolonialismus nach seinem formalen Ende, vor allem mit kolonial geprägten Denkweisen und Darstellungsformen, welche in engem Zusammenhang mit Rassismus stehen. Nach einem kurzen Rückblick auf die Geschichte des Kolonialismus und seiner Legitimation geht es im Seminar zunächst um Begriffsdefinitionen und wichtige Konzepte der Rassismusforschung. Danach widmen wir uns zentralen Texten der wichtigsten postkolonialen Theoretiker*innen sowie der Anwendung postkolonialer Konzepte auf die Entwicklungspolitik. Die Bereitschaft zum Lesen und Diskutieren anspruchsvoller theoretischer Texte sowie ein großes Interesse an ihrer Anwendung auf Entwicklungspolitik wird vorausgesetzt. Keine Vorkenntnisse erforderlich.

 

Epistemische Klimagerechtigkeit? Postkoloniale, feministische und dekoloniale Perspektiven auf Klima(wandel)wissen

Johanna Tunn

MA Politikwissenschaft/MA GPED

Blockseminar: 22./23.04, 29./30.04., 20./21.05., Arnold-Bode 2 - Raum 0408

Besonders in Ländern des Globalen Südens gefährden steigende Meeresspiegel, fortschreitende Wüstenbildung und andere Auswirkungen der globalen Erwärmung Millionen von Menschen. Gleichzeitig sind die Ursachen und Folgen des Klimawandels ein Spiegelbild globaler Ungleichheit und Ausbeutung. Im Zuge der wachsenden Aufmerksamkeit auf die Klimakrise und deren ungerechte Auswirkungen haben sich Institutionen gebildet, welche hohe gesellschaftliche Relevanz für die Erarbeitung von Strategien für die Bekämpfung des Klimawandels und seiner Ursachen innehaben. Dabei greifen Institutionen wie der Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) auf Wissen und Vorstellungswelten zurück, welche selbst das Ergebnis kultureller, politischer, historischer und sozialer Entwicklungen sind und in hegemoniale Strukturen eingebettet sind.

Wissen über den Klimawandel und von ihm betroffene Menschen ist weder neutral noch objektiv - es wurde und wird in privilegierten gesellschaftlichen Kontexten produziert. In diesem Seminar schauen wir uns die Kontexte, Prozesse und Auswirkungen der Produktion von Klimawandelwissen aus Perspektive der epistemischen Gerechtigkeit an. Ein genauer Blick auf die Einflüsse von Kolonialismus, Rassismus und Gewalt ist dabei unabdingbar. Die Traditionen des Postkolonialismus, der feministischen Wissenschaftskritik und des dekolonialen Denkens haben dabei ein großes Potenzial, diese gängigen Prozesse der Wissensproduktion zu hinterfragen, zu erschüttern und neu zu konstituieren.

Einführung in das politikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten: Ungleichheit, Rassismus, Klimawandel

Anil Shah

BA Politikwissenschaft

Mi 8-10h, Moritzstr. 18 Campus Center - Raum 1112, Seminarraum 3

Das Seminar verbindet aktuelle gesellschaftliche Debatten zur Corona-Pandemie, Klimakatastrophe und Black Lives Matter mit kritischen Analysen aus dem Bereich Gesellschaftswissenschaften. Studierende setzen sich im Laufe des Seminars mit unterschiedlichen Textformen – von Zeitungsartikeln bis zu wissenschaftlichen Beiträgen aus Fachzeitschriften – auseinander und lernen dabei, Argumentationsmuster zu identifizieren sowie Stärken und Schwächen eines Texts ausfindig zu machen. In den ersten Sitzungen werden einführende Fragen geklärt: Was ist Wissenschaft? Wie politisch ist Politikwissenschaft? Was ist Bildung? Und was hat all das mit Macht und Herrschaft zu tun? Im Anschluss werden unterschiedliche Dimensionen von Ungleichheit im Zuge der Corona-Pandemie, Analysen zu Ursachen und Dynamiken der globalen Klimakatastrophe, struktureller Rassismus in Deutschland und Fragen nach Zukunftsaussichten diskutiert.

 

The World Bank and the Inspection Panel

Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

MA GPED, MCC V/MA Politikwissenschaft

Di 14-16h,  Arnold-Bode 10 - Raum 0104

After a general introduction to the World Bank, its history and changing purpose, the course will focus on the accountability mechanism of the institution: the Inspection Panel. The IP provides the opportunity for persons negatively affected by World Bank projects to file claims against them. Examining case studies, we will explore to what extent the IP was able to serve its purpose of making the voice of these persons heard and democratize global governance. Instead of a normal seminar paper, students will write reports on so far unresearched case studies which can be published on the home page of the research project on the IP.

 

Introduction to Globalization and Development

Anil Shah

MA GPED, MCC I

Mo 9-12h, ICDD/GPN Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023hybrid

This seminar will introduce students to the interconnected paradigms of globalization and development – both having shaped debates on economics, politics and culture throughout the world since the mid-20th century. Yet both have a much longer trajectory, notably 500 years of European imperialism and colonial conquest which have shaped contemporary forms of this interconnection. The course is structured along three major sections. In the first part, the meaning of globalization and development will be contextualized and discussed, particularly in relationship to the political economy of capitalism, colonialism, imperialism, and neoliberalism. The second section discusses contemporary issues and debates related to globalization and development, including the COVID-19 pandemic, global value chains, urbanization and informalization of production and labour in the Global South, the financialization of development, and the failure of international climate governance. The final part of the course is dedicated to questions of resisting, changing, and overcoming globalization and development, and developing a radical imagination of other common futures.

 

Discourse analysis and postcolonial research

Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

MA GPED, Advanced Research methods

Mi 10-12h, Moritzstr. 25-31, Systembau2 - Raum 0206

This course must be taken in combination with the lecture on advanced research methods. The course will deal with the interconnectedness of knowledge and power, with discourse analysis as a methodological approach to trace this connection, and with postcolonial perspectives on methodology and research ethics highlighting specifically the relation between scientific knowledge and colonial relations of power.

 

Introduction to Political Science/GPE

Dr. Corinna Dengler

MA GPED

Blockseminar, am 27.10., 10.11. und 24.11. jeweils 10-16h. Gottschalkstr. 10-12 - Raum 2205

This seminar introduces you to the specific approach applied in the master’s program Global Political Economy and Development. It is designed as a supplementary tutorial to the core courses ‘Governance of the World Markets’ and ‘Introduction to Globalization and Development.’ The course covers the following questions:

• What is Global Political Economy and how did it emerge as an academic approach?

• What is the ‘political’ in GPE and why is the analysis of history and power relations essential?

• Why do ‘theory’ and ‘critique’ matter for GPE research?

• How can GPE analysis of the contemporary world economy look like?

The course is structured into three parts, namely (I) What is Global Political Economy?; (II) History, Power, Theory & Critique; and (III) Contemporary GPE Analysis, to which we will devote one seminar day (10am4-pm) respectively. The seminar is based on readings and students are expected to (a) read all texts, (b) highlight important arguments, and (c) note questions and criticism prior to the seminar sessions. Moreover, students are expected to actively participate in class discussions. There are neither assignments nor grades for this tutorial, which primarily seeks to prepare you for other courses in the GPED master’s program. The course is primarily oriented towards students who have no background in social sciences, however, students who are unfamiliar with International Political Economy (IPE) are also welcome to participate.

 

Arbeitsbeziehungen in Globalen Produktionsnetzwerken

Dr. Frauke Banse

MA Politikwissenschaft, Projektseminar, Teil 2

Di 10-12h, Moritzstr. 2 - Raum Incon

Bei dem Seminar handelt es sich um den zweiten Teil des Projektseminars. Dieses wird inhaltlich sehr stark von den studentischen Projektgruppen geprägt werden, genaue inhaltliche Schwerpunkte sind entlang der jeweiligen Projektinhalte in Planung.


Einführung in das politikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten: Was sind Gewerkschaften?

Dr. Frauke Banse

Lehramt und BA Politikwissenschaft

Mittwoch 10-12h, Georg-Forster-Str. 4 - Raum 1004

In diesem Seminar und im dazu zugehörigen Tutorium (von Sophia Schönig) geht es darum, die grundlegenden Fertigkeiten für ein erfolgreiches Studium der Politikwissenschaft zu erlernen. Wie lese und schreibe ich wissenschaftliche Texte? Wie zitiere ich korrekt? Wie entwickle ich eine Fragestellung und eine Gliederung? Wie erkenne ich verschiedene Thesen von Autor*innen? Weshalb ist eine gute Begriffsarbeit bedeutend für die politikwissenschaftliche Analyse? Diese und andere Fragen behandeln wir anhand des Themenfeldes Gewerkschaften.


BA Kolloquium

Dr. Frauke Banse

Dienstag 14-16h, Mönchebergstr. 1 - Raum 3012 Seminarraum III

Das Kolloquium unterstützt BA Studierende in der Abschlussphase beim Anfertigen ihrer Abschlussarbeit. Wir werden einführend wichtige Anforderungen an eine BA Arbeit, Aufbau sowie Herausforderungen des theoretischen und empirischen Arbeitens besprechen. In der zweiten Phase des Seminars werden die Teilnehmenden in thematisch organisierten Arbeitsgruppen ein kurzes Forschungsexposé anfertigen, auf deren Grundlage wir abschließend die Forschungsvorhaben der Teilnehmenden diskutieren.

 

Globale Gesundheit und COVID-19

Anna Weber

BA Politikwissenschaft

Blockseminar, am 22.10.21, 26.11.21, 27.11.21., 21.01.22 und 22.01.22

Im Politikfeld Globale Gesundheit wurde schon vor Jahren vor drohenden Epidemien und Pandemien gewarnt. Der global ungleiche Zugang zu Arzneimitteln und gesundheitlichen Technologien ist schon seit Jahrzehnten umkämpft. Das Seminar befasst sich mit den historischen Entwicklungen in den Nord-Süd-/Ost-West-Beziehungen sowie mit der Rolle von staatlicher Politik und privatwirtschaftlichen Interessen in der internationalen Gesundheitspolitik, die die Covid-19-Pandemie prägen. Was bedeutet es, wenn die US-Regierung Offenheit signalisiert, den Patentverzichtsantrag (TRIPS-Waiver) für Corona-Impfstoffe bei der Welthandelsorganisation zu unterstützen, nicht aber die Aussetzung von privaten Schutzrechten für COVID-19-Diagnostika und -Therapeutika? Wie ist die Corona-Krise in der Verschränkung mit weiteren Krisen, mit wachsenden Ungleichheiten innerhalb sowie zwischen den Ländern oder mit ökologischen Krisen zu verstehen? Die Studierenden werden diese Fragen sowie selbstgewählte Fragen und relevante Themen mit Hilfe bereitgestellter und selbst recherchierter Materialien kritisch bearbeiten.

 

Post-Development Theories

Caroline Cornier

MA GPED/MA Politikwissenschaft, Modul 2

Di 10-12h, online

Post-Development approaches challenge the very foundations of development theory and policy as being Eurocentric and constituting relations of power between those defined as ‘developed’ and as ‘underdeveloped’. They propose ‘alternatives to development’ to be found in grassroots movements and indigenous communities which go beyond the Western models of the economy, politics and knowledge. The seminar will deal with some of the main texts of Post-Development, its variants and proposed alternatives, but also with the sharp criticisms raised against this school by development theory, with empirical examples and current debates on the topic.

 

Einführung in die postkoloniale Politikwissenschaft

Caroline Cornier

BA Politikwissenschaft

Blockseminar im Januar/Februar

Beyond Development? Entwicklungstheorien aus transdisziplinärer Perspektive

Dienstags, 10-12Uhr, für B.A. Politikwissenschaften
Dr. Corinna Dengler

Das Seminar is als Einführung in verschiedene Entwicklungstheorien und -paradigmen konzipiert und reicht von modernisierungstheoretischen Ansätzen über Dependenz- und Weltsystemtheorie hin zu Ansätzen, die nicht nach Entwicklungsalternativen, sondern nach Alternativen zur Entwicklung suchen. Ein thematischer Schwerpunkt liegt dabei auf feministisch-dekolonialen Ansätzen. Das Seminar stützt sich auf das Buch Schmidt, Lukas & Schröder, Sabine (2016): Entwicklungstheorien - Klassiker, Kritik und Alternativen. Wien: Mandelbaum. Die Anschaffung des Lehrbuchs wird empfohlen.

Feminism, Decoloniality, and the Environment

Dienstags, 12-14Uhr, für M.A. GPED
Dr. Corinna Dengler

This class sketches out postcolonial perspectives on an ecofeminist political economy by examining existing and potential links, intersections, and discrepancies between feminisms, decoloniality, and the environment. In a first part, students will be familiarized with key concepts, engage with the feminist and postcolonial critique of science, and gain an overview of postcolonial feminisms as well as feminist academic engagement with the environment since the 1970s. The second part od the course then delves into postcolonial econfeminisms. After some socio-historical conceptual notes, e.g. on postcolonial intersectionality and feminist political ecology, the interdisciplinary inquiry will explore specificities of ecofeminisms in the context of Latin America (most notably the Andean region), Africa (most notably South Africa and Mozambique), and Asia (most notably India). Part III rounds off the course by critically engaging with current debates on feminisms, decoloniality, and the environment. The topics in this part range from feminist-decolonial perspectives on (neo-)extractivism and degrowth to global care chains, collective modes of caring, and environmental activism.

The Politics of Finance and Development

Montags, 10-12Uhr, für M.A. GPED
Anil Shah

In the modern world, it has become a truism that 'money makes the world go round'. But how so? What are the fundamental channels, instruments and institutions that organisze global financial glows in the field of Development? And how are these linked to relations of power, dependency, and oppression? This course introduces students to selected debates on Finance and Development in International Political Economy (IPE). It traces the relationship between finance and development from Europe's colonial expansion to the present-day era. The first part highlights how the birth of international finance in the form of joint-stock companies, insurance, and sovereign debt is linked to both capitalist development and colonial oppression. The secon part deals with key institutions, instruments and channels of development finance in the twentieth century, including (multilateral) development banks, bilateral development assistance and conditional loans. Building on these foundations, the third part of the seminar reviews current debates on financialization and financing sustainable development. Students will be familiarized with contemporary shifts in global development policy that highlight the role of private and market-based finance in achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals. 

Policy Making in the European Union: EU Trade, Investment and Development Policies

Blockseminar + Exkursion, für M.A. GPED & M.A. Politikwissenschaften
Dr. Frauke Banse

Arbeitsbedingungen in globalen Produktionsnetzwerken

Dienstags, 10-12Uhr, für M.A. Politikwissenschaften
Dr. Frauke Banse

Die Bretton Woods Institutionen in der Entwicklungspolitik

Dienstags, 14-16Uhr, für M.A. Politikwissenschaften und Lehramt
Dr. Frauke Banse

Rassismus und Postkoloniale Studien

Mittwochs, 08-10Uhr, für B.A. Politikwissenschaften
Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

Das Seminar ist gegliedert in drei Teile. Im ersten befassen wir uns mit dem Phänomen des Rassismus, mit seinen unterschiedlichen Erscheinungsformen und unterschiedlichen Ansätzen der Rassismustheorie. Im zweiten Teil geht es um die postkolonialien Studien, die sich mit den Nachwirkungen des Kolonialismus nach seinem formalen Ende, v.a. mit kolonial geprägten Denkweisen und Darstellungsformen befassen. Diese Ansätze werden durch Lektüre einiger zentraler Texte verschiedener postkolonialier Theoretiker_innen (z.B. Hall, Fanon, Said, Mohanty,...) erschlossen. Im dritten Teil geht es um die Frage nach dem Verhältnis der beiden Forschungsfelder und ihre Verknüpfung. Die Seminartexte werden in einem Moodle-Kurs zur Verfügung gestellt.

Theories of Development and Global Political Economy

Dienstags, 16-18:30Uhr, für M.A. GPED
Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

After a general introduction on epistemology, the course will offer different paradigms concerning theories of global political economy, inequality and social change. It will engage with explanations from historical and contemporary perspectives (such as modernization, dependency, neo-marxist and feminist approaches) and analyse their ontological and methodological assumptions - as well as their biases and blind spots.
The course consists of a 45min lecture and a 90min seminar. A number of texts will be taken from Chari, Sharad/Corbridge, Stuart (eds.) 2008: The Development Reader. London: Routledge.

Traumjob Entwicklungspolitik? Post-Development Perspektiven auf entwicklungspolitische Fachkräfte

Blockseminar, für B.A. Politikwissenschaften
Meike Strehl

Studying Social Movements beyond Eurocentrism

Blockseminar, für M.A. GPED
Sabrina Keller & Ruth Steuerwald

Decolonising Development

Do 10-12, Online

Dr. Jenna Marshall

Development projects conventionally claim to marshal scarce resources in the expectation for future benefits to enhance social and economic welfare. Yet how do legacies of imperialism and colonialism complicate this claim? What then does it mean to appraise the value of development projects decolonially? This course enables students to gain insights into how Eurocentrism remains entrenched within international development funding bodies, institutions and actors in order to understand the impact of colonial legacies on funding initiatives and policies - but also how these neo-imperial logics are confronted and resisted. In the first part of the syllabus, students will be exposed to post/decolonial methods of analysis that identify the various manifestations Eurocentrism takes (such as racialisation, othering, imperial episteme, economism etc.) in development. In the second part of the course, students will be introduced to current international development actors and policies to examine in-depth two (2) World-Bank sponsored projects: the Sardar Sarovar dam in India; the Chad-Cameroon Oil Pipeline. The aim of this course is to assess the degree to which empire and its colonial afterlives persists in structuring the ecologies, economies and societies in the global South. This course will encourage the development of policy analysis skills and the application of de/postcolonial critique in the international development field.

Discourse analysis and postcolonial research

Di 14-16, Online

Dr. Jenna Marshall

This course explores the interconnectedness of research interests as well as political and ethical commitments through an examination of methods of discourse analysis and postcolonialism in social scienceresearch. Discourse analysis is concerned with, amongst other things, the structural relationships of power manifested, constituted and legitimized usinglanguage (or in discourse). It also gives rise to theorizessocial processes and structures that produces discoursesas well as the social structures and processes within which individuals makes these discourses meaningful. In furthering these dynamics of power and knowledge,the course asks: Who is permitted entry into such theorization of the social world? The reminder of the course follows this line of inquiry by outlining the significance of postcolonial perspectives on methodology and research ethics. Here, students will explore the ways in which some peoples, cultures, cosmovisions are foreclosed from the realm of legitimate knowledge production. This epistemic silencing is predicatedon European Enlightenment and institutionalised through various techniques of colonial domination. Research from the perspective of the colonized therefore becomes complicit in imperial expansion and legitimates colonial violence across the world. Yet postcolonial perspectives also seek to remedy this violence through alternative approaches to knowledge production that democratizes encounters with others, opening up new vistas and modes of critique.

Einführung in die Entwicklungspolitik

Mi 10-12, Online

Beginn: 04.11.2020

Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

Entwicklungspolitik soll die Lebensbedingungen von Menschen in als weniger entwickelt definierten Ländern verbessern. Das Seminar wird einen Überblick über das Politikfeld und seine Geschichte, Theorien, Akteure, Instrumente, Kritik und aktuellen Debatten aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven geben.

Finanzialisierung von Entwicklungspolitik

Dr. Frauke Banse

In den letzten Jahren haben wir immer wieder von einem "Ende der Entwicklungshilfe", von einer neuen "Partnerschaft auf Augenhöhe" z.B. zwischen Afrika und Europa gehört. Es gelte unter anderem, weniger Geld westlicher Staaten zu geben und stattdessen stärker private Gelder in die Finanzierung von Straßen, Schulen, Energieversorgung oder Häfen in so genannten Entwicklungsländern fließen zu lassen. Doch was verbirgt sich hinter diesem Postulat? Welche gesellschaftlichen Folgen hat dieser Paradigmenwechsel in der Entwicklungshilfe? Wie sind diese neuen Finanzierungspraktiken in die globalen Dynamiken einer Finanzialisierung, also eines wachsenden politischen und ökonomischen Einflusses von Finanzmarktakteuren, einzuordnen? In dem Seminar werden wir uns mit diesen Fragen intensiv beschäftigen.

Globales Lernen, ein Beitrag zur sozial-ökologischen Transformation?

Mo 16-18, Online

Beginn: 02.11.2020

Nilda Inkermann

Globales Lernen versteht sich als pädagogische Antwort auf die Globalisierung und nimmt für sich in Anspruch, Veränderungsprozesse im Sinne globaler Gerechtigkeit und Nachhaltigkeit mitzugestalten. In diesem Seminar werden wir uns mit der Entstehung und Verbreitung des Globalen Lernens auseinandersetzen. Dem sowohl pädagogischen als auch politischen Bildungsansatz liegen globalgesellschaftliche Problemdiagnosen und -analysen zugrunde, diese zu verstehen und zu diskutieren ist wichtiger Bestandteil des Seminars. Im Zentrum dieses Seminars steht die Frage, welches Wissen und welche Bildung notwendig ist, für ein zukunftsfähiges Zusammenleben auf unserem Planeten und welche Perspektiven Globales Lernen dafür bietet.

Introduction to Global Political Economy

Mo 10-12, Online

Beginn: 02.11.2020

Anil Shah

This seminar introduces you to the specific approach applied in the master’s program Global Political Economy and Development. It is designed as a supplementary tutorial to the core courses ‘Governance of the World Markets’ and ‘Introduction to Globalization and Development’.

Introduction to Globalization and Development

Mi 14-16, Online, begleitendes Tutorium 

Beginn: 04.11.2020

Dr. Jenna Marshall

This course will introduce students to the interconnected paradigms of globalization and development – both having shaped debates on economics, politics and culture in the ‘Global North’ and ‘Global South’ for at least three decades. Yet both have a much longer trajectory, notably 500 years of European imperialism and colonial conquest which have shaped contemporary forms of this interconnection. Moreover, both paradigms are be set by internal tensions between coexisting universalising as well as hierarchising dynamics withtheoretical roots in European Enlightenment thought. The course begins with situating both paradigms: development as a project of international policies towards and within the ‘Global South’ since the end of World War II and its replacement by a globalisation project emerging in the late 20th century. It then examines competing debates of globalisation and assessment of contemporary globalising processes, and how these particularly influence the developing world. It examines these influences through detailed analysis of contemporary manifestations of ‘globalisation’, including liberalism and protectionism and whether we can conceive of the present conjecture as the end of the globalization project due to the collapse of the liberal international order. The course will also be devoted to particular policy issues, such as global migration and transnationalism, the environment and land dispossession, underpinned by the international rules that govern them. The course will later examine the ways in which ‘globalisation’ is resisted,focusing on the rise of transnational social movements and the post-development era, as well as the possibility of transformation through an inclusion of marginalized voices that render visible the gendered and racialized processes embedded within these projects.

Propädeutikum: Einführung in das politikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten

Mi 8-10, Online, begleitendes Tutorium

Beginn: 04.11.2020

Anil Shah

Das Seminar verbindet aktuelle gesellschaftliche Debatten um Ungleichheit, Rassismus und die ökologische Krise mit kritischen Analysen aus dem Bereich Gesellschaftswissenschaften. In den ersten Sitzungen werden einführende Fragen geklärt: Was ist Wissenschaft? Wie politisch ist Politikwissenschaft? Was ist Bildung? Was hat all das mit Macht und Herrschaft zu tun? Im Anschluss setzen sich Studierende mit unterschiedlichen Textformen – von Zeitungsartikeln bis zu wissenschaftlichen Beiträgen aus Fachzeitschriften – auseinander und lernen dabei anhand von aktuellen Debatten Argumentationsmuster zu identifizieren, sowie Stärken und Schwächen eines Texts ausfindig zu machen. Im Laufe des Seminars lernen Studierende zwischen einer „Argumentation des Alltagsverstands“ und einer „wissenschaftlicher Argumentation“ zu unterscheiden. Ebenso sind Studierende nach Ende des Seminars dazu in der Lage zwischen „der Politik“ und „dem Politischen“ zu unterscheiden.

Postcolonial Political Eocnomy

Do 14-16, Online

Dr. Jenna Marshall

What stakes are at play within the current global  political  economy? Rising  inequality, deepening  social antagonisms, and market logic with impunity in the face of the climate emergency.International Political Economy has so far responded to these recurring concerns as representative of the long-standing  relationship  between power and wealth. Yet other relationships, namely those that involve imperialism, race and gender, and settler colonialism have been marginal to these debates. Following on recent calls for a more ‘global conversation’ within GPE that pays greater attention to spaces and communities beyond Europe and North America, this module seeks to confront the Eurocentric analysis of global political economy that might inform our understandings of contemporary issues of neoliberal  conjuncture of global capitalism. This course offers an historically-informed reassessmentof political economy that exposes its imperial foundations bydrawing on the entangled histories between European  industrialization, Atlantic slavery and its civilizing mission. The course broadly surveys the role of land and dispossession as both object and instrument of colonial power in the  consolidation of the  settler‐colonial state. The colonial origins of poverty within 18th century neoclassical tradition and the case of Haiti to explore ways debt was weaponized to compromise the nation-building processes of the world’s first black republic. This historical foregrounding situates contemporary challenges and political struggles as the colonial afterlives of contemporary global economic globalisation to explore  issues of financialization and the “rise” of corporate power,global care work and social reproduction, extractive industries and the ecology as well as the return to alt-right populism and anti-imperial politics in the form of reparations. By confronting the colonial amnesia of the discipline, the module hopes to provide students with interdisciplinary analyses that renders visible global political economy to its embedded relationship with coloniality, racism, sexism or anthropocentrism and to invite new framings and questions to attend to the ongoing global crises.

Post-Development Theories and Alternatives to ‘Development’

Di 14-16, Online

Beginn: 03.11.2020

Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

Post-Development approaches challenge the very foundations of development theory and policy as being Eurocentric and constituting relations of power between those defined as ‘developed’ and as ‘underdeveloped’. They propose ‘alternatives to development’ to be found ingrassroots movements and indigenous communities which go beyond the Western models of the economy, politics and knowledge.The seminar will deal with some of the main texts of Post-Development, its variants and proposed alternatives, but also with the sharp criticisms raised against this school by development theory, with empirical examples and current debates on the topic.

 

Einführung in Rassismustheorien

Blockseminar, Beginn 26.11.2020

Eleonora Roldán Mendívil

In dem Blockseminar werden wir uns mit den sozialwissenschaftlich relevantesten Analysen von Rassismus in westlichen Gesellschaften auseinandersetzen. Durch Primär- und Sekundärliteratur (auf Englisch und Deutsch) erhalten die Kursteilnehmenden einen Überblick über liberale und radikale Denkschulen zu Rassismus, sowie zentralen Widerstandsbewegungen von nicht-weißen Menschen und Migrant_innen in den USA und Deutschland (z.B. Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, Young Lords, Arbeitskämpfe von Migrant_innen 1973 in Deutschland, Antifa Gençlik). Das Seminar wird sich zentral mit den Theorien von C.L.R. James und Frantz Fanon beschäftigen und wird den Teilnehmenden Werkzeuge für materialistische politikwissenschaftliche Rassismusanalysen an die Hand geben.

Einführung in die Entwicklungspolitik

Blockseminar
Beginn: 05.06.2020
Esther Kronsbein 

Internationale Politik in einer postkolonialen Welt

Mi 8 - 10 Uhr
Beginn: 22.04.2020
Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai 

Decolonising Development

Di 12 - 14 Uhr
Beginn: 21.04.2020
Dr. Jenna Marshall

Decent Work in Global Value Chains

Di 12 - 14 Uhr
Beginn: 21.04.2020
Dr. Frauke Banse

Postcolonial Political Economy

Do 14 - 16 Uhr
Beginn: 23.04.2020
Dr. Jenna Marshall

Theories of Development and GPE

Di 16 - 18.30 Uhr
Beginn: 21.04.2020
Prof. Dr. Aram Ziai

Discourse Analysis and Postcolonial Research
Do 14-16, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3024, ICDD
Beginn: 24.10.19
Dr. Jenna Marshall

 

Einführung in die Entwicklungspolitik
Mo 16-18, Moritzstr. 25-31 Systembau2 - Raum 0209
Beginn: 21.10.19
Nilda Inkermann

 

Introduction to Globalization and Development
Mi 14-16, Kleine Rosenstraße 1-3 - Raum 3023, ICDD
Beginn: 23.10.19
Dr. Jenna Marshall

 

Mali - der Konflikt und die internationalen Beziehungen
Mi 10-12, Gottschalkstraße 10-12 - Raum 2201
Beginn: 23.10.19
Dr. Frauke Banse

 

Postdevelopment zur Einführung
Blockseminar
Fr, 13.12.19; 16-20 Arnold-Bode 2 - Raum 0408
Sa, 14.12.19; 9-18 Arnold-Bode 2 - Raum 0401
Fr, 24.01.20;16-20 Nora-Platiel 8 - Raum 0419
Sa, 25.01.20; 9-18 Nora-Platiel 6 - Raum 0211
Dr. Julia Schöneberg

 

Propädeutikum mit post- und dekolonialen Perspektiven - Einführung in das politikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten (mit Tutorium)
Mi 10-12, Moritzstr. 25-31 Systembau 2 Raum 0208
Beginn: 23.10.19
Dipl. Pol. Joshua Kwesi Aikins

 

Ursachen und Migration in Subsahara Afrika und die deutsche Entwicklungspolitik, Teil 2
Mi 8-10, Arnold-Bode 2 - Raum 0402
Beginn: 23.10.19
Dr. Frauke Banse